7 Best Home Remedies For ALOPECIA AREATA, Rapid Hair Loss & Baldness – YouTube

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Sometimes, it can lead to the complete loss of hair on the scalp (alopecia totalis) or, in extreme cases, the entire body (alopecia universalis).

The condition can affect anyone regardless of age and gender, though most cases occur before the age of 30.

The most common form of alopecia areata treatment is the use of corticosteroids, powerful anti-inflammatory drugs that can suppress the immune system. These are mostly commonly administered through local injections, topical ointment application, or orally.

Other medications that can be prescribed that either promote hair growth or affect the immune system include Minoxidil, Anthralin, SADBE, and DPCP. Although some of these may help with the re-growth of hair, they cannot prevent the formation of new bald patches.

Alopecia areata does not directly make people sick, nor is it contagious. It can, however, be difficult to adapt to emotionally. For many people, alopecia areata is a traumatic disease that warrants treatment addressing the emotional aspect of hair loss, as well as the hair loss itself.

Alopecia areata has been compared by some to vitiligo, an autoimmune skin disease where the body attacks melanin-producing cells, leading to white patches. Research suggests that these two conditions may share a similar pathogenesis, with similar types of immune cells and cytokines driving the diseases and common genetic risk factors.

Preliminary research in animals has found that quercetin, a naturally occurring bioflavonoid found in fruits and vegetables, can protect against the development of alopecia areata and effectively treat existing hair loss.

The condition occurs when white blood cells attack the cells in hair follicles, causing them to shrink and dramatically slow down hair production. It is unknown precisely what causes the body’s immune system to target hair follicles in this way.

While scientists are unsure why these changes occur, it seems that genetics are involved as alopecia areata is more likely to occur in a person who has a close family member with the disease. One in five people with the disease has a family member who has also developed alopecia areata.

Other research has found that many people with a family history of alopecia areata also have a personal or family history of other autoimmune disorders, such as atopy, a disorder characterized by a tendency to be hyperallergic, thyroiditis, and vitiligo.

Despite what many people think, there is very little scientific evidence to support the view that alopecia areata is caused by stress. Extreme cases of stress could potentially trigger the condition, but most recent research points toward a genetic cause.

There are some people that recommend rubbing onion or garlic juice, cooled green tea, almond oil, rosemary oil, honey, or coconut milk into the scalp. While none of these are likely to cause harm, their effectiveness is also not supported by research.

The most prominent symptom of alopecia areata is patchy hair loss. Coin-sized patches of hair begin to fall out, mainly from the scalp. Any site of hair growth may be affected, though, including the beard and eyelashes.

The loss of hair can be sudden, developing in just a few days or over a period of a few weeks. There may be itching or burning in the area before hair loss. The hair follicles are not destroyed and so hair can re-grow if the inflammation of the follicles subsides. People who experience just a few patches of hair loss often have a spontaneous, full recovery without any form of treatment.

About half of patients recover from alopecia areata within 1 year, but many will experience more than one episode. Around 10 percent of people will go on to develop alopecia totalis or alopecia universalis.

Alopecia areata can also affect the fingernails and toenails, and sometimes these changes are the first sign that the condition is developing. There are a number of small changes that can occur to nails:

If, after an initial clinical examination, the doctor is not able to make a diagnosis, they can perform a skin biopsy. If they need to rule out other autoimmune diseases, they might perform a blood test.

Article last updated by Adam Felman on Fri 22 December 2017.

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All references are available in the References tab.

Açıkgöz. G, Yeşil, H., Çalışkan, E., Tunca, M., & Akar, A. (2013, October 9). Targeted photochemotherapy in alopecia areata [Abstract]. Photodermatology, Photoimmunology & Photomedicine, 29(6),318-22. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24102724

Nilforoushzadeh, M. A., Keshtmand, G., Jaffary, F., & Kheirkhah, A. (2012, July 1). Diphencyprone induced vitiligo: A case report [Abstract]. 2012:356236. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22811720

Wikramanayake, T. C., Villasante, A. C., Mauro, L. M., Perez, C. I., Schachner, L. A., & Jimenez, J. J. (2012, March). Prevention and treatment of alopecia areata with quercetin in the C3H/HeJ mouse model [Abstract]. 17(2):267-74. Retrieved from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22042611

© 2004-2019 All rights reserved. MNT is the registered trade mark of Healthline Media. Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a healthcare professional.

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Occasionally wearing tight hairstyles is not a problem, and some daily hair loss is normal. According to the American Academy of Dermatology, humans lose between 50 and 100 hairs every day, which are usually replaced by new hair growth.

A related condition called central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA) can also occur when hair loss starts on the crown and moves outwards. This type of alopecia is likely to cause scarring on the scalp.

It is vital to keep hair healthy by getting enough protein and iron, which are essential for hair growth. Good sources of iron include beans, nuts, brown rice, meat, and leafy vegetables, such as spinach.

Article last reviewed by Thu 18 January 2018.

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All references are available in the References tab.

Akingbola, C. O., & Vyas, J. (2017, August 31). Traction alopecia: A neglected entity in 2017. Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology, and Leprology83(6), 644–649. Retrieved from http://www.ijdvl.com/article.asp?issn=0378-6323;year=2017;volume=83;issue=6;spage=644;epage=649;aulast=Akingbola

Goren, A., Shapiro, J., Roberts, J., McCoy, J., Desai, N., Zarrab, Z., … Lotti, T. (2015, January–February). Clinical utility and validity of minoxidil response testing in androgenetic alopecia [Abstract]. Dermatologic Therapy28(1), 13–16. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25112173

James, J., Saladi, R. N., & Fox, J. L. (2007, September–October). Traction alopecia in Sikh male patients. The Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine20(5), 497-498. Retrieved from http://www.jabfm.org/content/20/5/497.full

Khumalo, N. P., Jessop, S., Gumedze, F., & Ehrlich, R. (2007, November). Hairdressing and the prevalence of scalp disease in African adults [Abstract]. British Journal of Dermatology157(5), 981–988. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17725667

Lawson, C. N., Hollinger, J., Sethi, S., Rodney, I., Sarkar, R., Dlova, N., … Callender, V. D. (2017, March). Updates in the understanding and treatments of skin & hair disorders in women of color. International Journal of Women’s Dermatology3(1 Suppl), S21–S37. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5419061/

Tanus, A., Oliveira, C. C. C., Villarreal, D. J. V., Sanchez, F. A. V., & Dias, M. F. R. G. (2015, July–August). Black women’s hair: The main scalp dermatoses and aesthetic practices in women of African ethnicity. Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia90(4), 450–465. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4560533/

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With all forms of alopecia area, the body’s immune system attacks healthy hair follicles, which causes them to become smaller and decrease in production to the point where hair growth may stop altogether.

For people who have less than 50 percent hair loss, current treatment options work to disrupt or distract the immune attack and stimulate the hair follicle. For people who experience more than 50 percent hair loss, there are oral and injectable medications available. However, these treatments are not successful for everyone.

Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers conducted an open-label clinical trial – whereby both researchers and participants knew what treatment was administered – of 12 people with alopecia areata.

While there is currently no treatment capable of completely restoring hair, CUMC investigators have shown that topical and oral drugs that inhibit the Janus kinase (JAK) family of enzymes, known as JAK inhibitors, could potentially fill the role of stimulating hair regrowth.

“Although our study was small, it provides crucial evidence that JAK inhibitors may constitute the first effective treatment for people with alopecia areata,” says Dr. Julian Mackay-Wiggan, associate professor of dermatology and director of the Clinical Research Unit in the Department of Dermatology at CUMC, and a dermatologist at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia.

Previous research by the team revealed specific immune cells and dominant inflammatory signaling pathways that are responsible for attacking the hair follicle in people with alopecia areata, resulting in the follicle entering a dormant state.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have already approved two JAK inhibitors: a medication used to treat bone marrow malignancies called ruxolitinib, which was the focus of the CUMC research, and a treatment for rheumatoid arthritis called tofacitinib that the Stanford/Yale study explored.

“These disorders are both characterized by dysregulated signaling pathways, similar to alopecia areata, which is dominated by the interferon signaling pathway. Even though the diseases are very different, this common feature gave us the initial idea to test JAK inhibitors in people with alopecia,” says Dr. Raphael Clynes, Ph.D., associate professor of dermatology at CUMC.

The researchers tested their hypothesis by enrolling 12 people with moderate to severe alopecia with more than 30 percent hair loss. Participants were administered 20 milligrams of oral ruxolitinib twice a day for 3-6 months. Follow-up took place over a further 3 months to assess the permanence of treatment response.

Results showed that nine of the patients – 75 percent – presented 50 percent or more hair regrowth. By the end of the treatment period, 77 percent of participants who responded to ruxolitinib therapy achieved more than 95 percent hair regrowth.

Skin biopsies were performed before, during, and after treatment. In responders, the biopsies showed a reduction in levels of interferon signaling and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which are indicators of inflammatory response. They also had increased levels of hair keratins, which are proteins that indicate hair growth. These levels are similar to those seen in people without alopecia areata.

People with alopecia areata who did not respond to treatment had lower levels of inflammatory signatures in biopsy results before treatment began, which may indicate that scientists could potentially distinguish between people who will and will not respond to treatment.

“We are very excited about the use of biomarkers to follow the response of patients to this treatment,” says Angela M. Christiano, Ph.D., the Richard and Mildred Rhodebeck professor of dermatology and professor of genetics and development at CUMC. “This will allow us to so monitor improvements in their gene expression signatures even before hair growth appears.”

“While larger, randomized trials are needed to confirm the safety and efficacy of ruxolitinib in people with moderate to severe alopecia areata, our initial results are very encouraging,” Mackay-Wiggan adds.

The Stanford/Yale study also showed a positive response to the JAK inhibitor tofacitinib. “Together, the two studies show that we’re on the right track,” says Dr. Christiano, a co-author of the tofacitinib paper.

Future research by the CUMC team will focus on testing JAK inhibitors in conditions such as vitiligo, scarring alopecia, and male pattern baldness. “We expect JAK inhibitors to have widespread utility across many forms of hair loss based on their mechanism of action in both the hair follicle and immune cells,” concludes Dr. Christiano.

© 2004-2019 All rights reserved. MNT is the registered trade mark of Healthline Media. Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a healthcare professional.

2019 Healthline Media UK Ltd. All rights reserved. MNT is the registered trade mark of Healthline Media. Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a healthcare professional.

Healthline Media, Inc. would like to process and share personal data (e.g., mobile ad id) and data about your use of our site (e.g., content interests) with our third party partners (see a current list) using cookies and similar automatic collection tools in order to a) personalize content and/or offers on our site or other sites, b) communicate with you upon request, and/or c) for additional reasons upon notice and, when applicable, with your consent.

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When using essential oils on the scalp, be sure to mix only a few drops into a carrier oil, such as coconut oil or walnut oil. The researchers also state that inhaling the scent of these oils may affect hair growth.

They discovered that men taking 400 milligrams (mg) of pumpkin seed oil for 6 months experienced a 40 percent increase in average hair count, whereas those taking a placebo only experienced a 10 percent increase.

Doctors tend to divide hair loss not related to age into two major categories: scarring and non-scarring hair loss. Generally speaking, scarring hair loss is permanent. Examples of scarring hair loss causes include scarring alopecia.

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Article last reviewed by Mon 15 April 2019.

Visit our Dermatology category page for the latest news on this subject, or sign up to our newsletter to receive the latest updates on Dermatology.

All references are available in the References tab.

Cho, Y. H., et al. (2014). Effect of pumpkin seed oil on hair growth in men with androgenic alopecia: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4017725/

Koyoma, T., et al. (2016). Standardized scalp massage results in increased hair thickness by inducing stretching forces to dermal papilla cells in the subcutaneous tissue. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4740347/

© 2004-2019 All rights reserved. MNT is the registered trade mark of Healthline Media. Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a healthcare professional.

2019 Healthline Media UK Ltd. All rights reserved. MNT is the registered trade mark of Healthline Media. Any medical information published on this website is not intended as a substitute for informed medical advice and you should not take any action before consulting with a healthcare professional.

Alopecia, in layman’s term means hair loss. It is a hair condition in which your immune system attacks hair follicles, causing hair loss in patches. Now, there are a number of possible reasons that could lead to hair loss like hormone replacement therapy, steroids and acne medication, to name a few. So, if you are suffering from alopecia and are looking for ways to deal with it, we have something for you. Here are 12 natural remedies that will help in boosting hair growth and strengthening hair follicles. 

Onion contains sulfur which stimulates growth of new hair and aides in fighting free radicals that can cause damage. It also improves circulation of blood in the scalp. Click here to see what you need to do.  

Massage aloe vera gel on to your hair and scalp and leave it on for 20 minutes before rinsing it off. Aloe vera gel acts as a stimulant that increases blood circulation in your scalp and is effective in treating alopecia. 

About 4.6 million people in the United States struggle with alopecia areata, an autoimmune disorder that occurs when the immune system mistakenly attacks your hair follicles and, as a result, causes hair loss on the scalp and various parts of the body.

While there is currently no cure for alopecia areata (and no medications approved for its treatment), some people turn to a range of natural treatments and remedies in an effort to control the condition.

For a report published in the American Journal of Clinical Dermatology in 2010, scientists sized up the available research on the use of complementary and alternative remedies and therapies in the treatment of alopecia areata. However, in their analysis of the 13 studies selected for the review, the authors found that no study was well-designed enough to provide “robust evidence” of the benefit of any type of complementary and/or alternative approach in the management of this condition.

A form of Panax ginseng, Korean red ginseng shows promise in the treatment of alopecia areata. In a preliminary study published in the Journal of Ginseng Research in 2012, scientists observed that Korean red ginseng may help promote hair growth in people with alopecia areata.

A number of small studies indicate that hypnosis may be beneficial for people with alopecia areata. These include a study published in the International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Hypnosis in 2008, for which 28 people with alopecia areata received hypnotherapy.

Of the 21 people who completed the study, 12 participants experienced significant hair growth after undergoing hypnosis. What’s more, all study participants showed a significant decrease in anxiety and depression after receiving hypnotherapy.

A study published in the Swedish journal Acta Dermato-Venereologica in 2011 also found that hypnosis may benefit people with alopecia areata. For this study, 21 people with alopecia areata received 10 sessions of hypnosis over a six-month period. By the study’s end, participants showed improvements in several markers of psychological wellbeing, including anxiety and depression.

Applying onion juice to parts of the head or body affected by alopecia areata may help promote hair growth, according to a small study published in the Journal of Dermatology in 2002. In an experiment involving 38 people with alopecia areata, those who used an onion-juice-based treatment twice daily for two months experienced significantly more hair growth compared to those assigned to a tap-water-based treatment for the same time period.

In a small study published in Archives of Dermatology in 1998, an aromatherapy treatment involving a blend of essential oils of thyme, rosemary, lavender, and cedarwood appeared to aid in the treatment of alopecia areata for some people.

For the study, 43 people with alopecia areata massaged a combination of these essential oils and the carrier oils jojoba and grapeseed into their scalps every day for seven months. Meanwhile, a second group of 41 people with alopecia areata massaged only jojoba and grapeseed oils into their scalp each day for the same time period.

In a preliminary study published in Acupuncture in Medicine in 2013, tests on mice demonstrated that electroacupuncture may inhibit certain alopecia-related changes in skin cells. Electroacupuncture is a form of acupuncture in which needles are attached to a device that produces continuous electric impulses and then placed at specific points on the patient’s body.

Stress may play an important role in triggering episodes of alopecia areata, according to a study published in the Journal of Dermatology in 1999. Although it’s possible that practicing stress management techniques could offer some protection against episodes of alopecia areata, there’s currently a lack of studies testing the use of such techniques in alopecia areata management.

While further clinical trials are needed, certain holistic therapies or remedies may be helpful to some degree. If you’re thinking of trying any type of natural treatment for alopecia areata, make sure to consult your healthcare provider first to weigh the pros and cons and discuss whether it’s appropriate for you.

Losing hair? It’s nothing short of a nightmare. Most of us are frightened at the sight of the hair falling off our head. The underlying fear is going bald. So, how do you deal with this problem? Read on to find out.

Earlier, baldness was associated with old age, but today, even young people are affected by it. Bad lifestyle choices, including lack of proper nutrition and stress, has made baldness all pervasive. While it is common in males, a small population of women too deals with this embarrassing hair issue. But is there a way out apart from the expensive option of hair transplantation? YES!

Massaging frequently with castor oil stimulates the roots of the hair by increasing the circulation of blood throughout the scalp. It nourishes the scalp with healthy fats and also prevents the occurrence of dandruff, which will abet hair growth (4).

Coconut oil contains nourishing fats and alpha-tocopherol that keep the scalp rejuvenated and hydrated. This, in turn, helps to strengthen the hair follicles and stimulate hair growth. Coconut oil is also rich in antioxidants that protect the scalp and the hair fibers from damage (5).

This antiallergenic essential oil possesses anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and antibacterial properties. It was shown in a study conducted in 2014 that peppermint oil induced the growth of thick and long hair in just a few weeks (6).

Pumpkin seed oil has been tested and proved to work for treating male pattern baldness or androgenetic alopecia (AGA). It is rich in carotenes, tocopherols, and other beneficial nutrients that play an important role in reversing alopecia. However, its exact mechanism of action for treating AGA is still not understood (7).

Extracted from the seeds of Arugula, taramira oil is popularly known as jamba oil in Hindi. It contains plenty of fatty acids and has anti-inflammatory and antifungal properties. Hair loss and baldness are often treated with this oil (9).

Olive oil blocks the hair loss hormones that are produced on the scalp. This reduces hair loss and promotes healthy hair growth. Olive oil also nourishes the skin on the scalp and keeps it infection-free (10).

This oil is beneficial to treat baldness that is non-hereditary. It closely resembles the naturally produced oil by the skin and is easily absorbed. It is rich in vitamin E, which takes away the oxidative stress that is resulting in baldness and hair loss (11, 12).

Extreme dandruff and infections of the scalp can sometimes lead to bald spots. In such cases, tea tree oil works wonderfully as it is a wide spectrum antimicrobial agent. It is also rich in antioxidants that can help rejuvenate the hair follicles (13).

Kaloni oil is also known as black seed oil and is often prescribed in Unani medicine to treat hair loss and bald spots. It strengthens the hair follicles and regenerates them, leading to fresh hair growth (14).

Onion regenerates the hair roots, and when mixed with honey, it works splendidly in treating hair loss. Applying the mixture on bald patches helps in improving hair growth (17). But do remember to wash off properly, or you will be left with an overpowering stench of onions!

Chinese medicine suggests the use of different herbs to tackle different types of baldness and hair loss. Fo-ti, Reishi mushroom, Ginkgo, Drynaria, and Morus Albus are the commonly prescribed Chinese herbs for baldness. These herbs usually work by increasing circulation on the scalp or working as a purifying tonic for the body fluids (20, 21). Consult a Chinese medicine specialist to know the right combination and the right dosage to treat your baldness.

Who knew the caffeine boost our morning cup of coffee gives us can be used for treating hair loss and baldness! The effectiveness of caffeine in promoting hair growth by inhibiting the growth hindrance factors was tested out by different groups of scientists. They concluded that caffeine can indeed enhance hair growth (22, 23).

Eggs are one of the best sources of protein. Protein is extensively required for hair growth and to prevent hair fall. Though stinky, it is a great option for hair growth. It not only increases the growth, but also makes the hair silky, shiny, and bouncy (24).

Before using any of these remedies, understand the root cause of your baldness and then opt for a remedy that will suit you the best. When it comes to hair loss and baldness, the progress is slow, but it is definitely there. Be patient, and you will definitely notice a difference when you use the above remedies. Here are some other methods to prevent and treat baldness.

To maintain the health of your hair, you need to avoid certain unhygienic and junk foods as they decelerate hair growth. Drinking sufficient quantity of water and keeping oneself hydrated are the best ways to prevent hair loss. Include enough portions of the foods mentioned below in your regular diet.

Vitamins A, B, C, and E are essential for healthy hair growth. They maintain healthy circulation of blood while providing the required nutrients and precursors for hair growth. The hair follicles remain in optimum health, and your scalp will be covered in a healthy growth of thick hair. Deficiencies in these vitamins have been associated with hair loss, so it is essential to maintain a diet with enough amount of these vitamins (26). Some examples of diet additions have been mentioned already. You can also opt for vitamin supplements, but before you do, confirm the appropriate dosage from a medical practitioner.

Ayurveda employs an alternative medicine therapy involving the usage of leeches to suck blood on the scalp, thus improving circulation. This helps to cover the bald spots with fresh hair growth (27). This technique should only be administered by a trained professional. Consult your local alternative medicine specialist to know more details about this procedure.

Acupuncture, a Chinese medical practice, involves activating the trigger points in your mind that will establish a balance in the body fluids and energies and resolve the problem. For baldness, there are many acupuncture points that are activated. This treatment is usually used in conjunction with a herbal remedy and vitamin supplementation.

Low laser light therapy is available at cosmetic clinics to promote hair regrowth and cover bald spots on the scalps. It is an expensive procedure, and there are many experts in the field who are not convinced of its efficacy. If you wish to go for this procedure to treat your baldness, do thorough research and then take a decision. Go to a reputed clinic and get the best advice.

Only men are affected by male pattern baldness. However, when a similar kind of excessive hair loss is seen in women, it is known as female pattern baldness. Its exact cause is unclear, but like male pattern baldness, hormones are said to be involved.

Hair loss is a devastating condition that affects millions of men and women around the world. Home remedies can be used without any worry as they do not have any adverse effects at all. And they are easily available in the kitchen and/or a nearby market. You need not drill a hole in your budget to treat baldness. These cheap home remedies for baldness can do the trick.

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How to treat baldness & regrow hair? LEARN the natural treatments for ALOPECIA AREATA & rapid hair loss.

We all have come to that stage of our lives that we do not take hair loss as a disorder anymore. We consider it a part of our daily routine and panic only when rapid hair loss becomes a frequent occurrence. One of the leading causes of hair loss is physical and emotional stress.

According to statistics, 80% women have noticeable hair loss by the age of 60. Every 1 in 4 women suffers from severe hair loss and breakage in spite of proper hair care and use of the best hair care products. Also, not always are the chemicals and ingredients responsible for problems related to hair.

Causes of hair loss:
1. Physical stress
2. Heredity
3. Emotional stress
4. Anemia
5. Over styling
6. Bad food habits
7. Aging
8. Alopecia Areata (Patchy Baldness that causes rapid hair loss)

Yes, all these could be the reasons for your hair loss. At times we don’t realize that the junk we relish might be the cause, we lose our hair. Though frightening, this condition can be treated. But before you lay your hands on the tips and tricks and the magical home remedies that will aid your treatment, let’s understand what exactly is Alopecia Areata. This severe hair loss condition is scientifically termed as Alopecia Areata.

Alopecia areata is patchy baldness and hair loss in any area of the body. This type of hair loss occurs, when the immune system mistakenly attacks our hair follicles, that is the root of hair. Although the reason why our immune system starts attacking the follicles is still unknown, the damage is not permanent.

Alopecia areata cannot be “cured, ” but it can be treated. You have the choice to wait for your hair to grow back naturally and not do any specific treatment. But if you cannot hold on, then here are some significant home remedies to help you fight this condition.

Alopecia Areata Hair Loss Treatment: Here are the 7 best home remedies for treatment of alopecia(patchy baldness)

Coconut oil for hair loss treatment
Take some warm coconut oil and massage it into the scalp for about 15-20 minutes. Leave it on for an hour and rinse. Do try out this alopecia cure twice a week for best results.

Onion juice for hair loss treatment
Grate one onion and strain the juice out of it. Apply this juice onto the scalp and leave it on for 30 minutes. Finally, rinse with fresh water. This is yet again one of the best treatments for alopecia. Other than controlling this condition onion juice is effective in hair regrowth.

Amla powder & lemon hair loss treatment
Take one tablespoon of amla powder and make a pulp out of it by mixing a little water. Mix this paste with one tablespoon of lemon juice. Massage it into the scalp properly. Cover with a shower cap and let it rest for 2-3 hours. Rinse with a mild shampoo.

Essential oils for hair loss treatment & hair regrowth:

Essential oils have shown considerable results when it comes to treating hair fall. For this remedy, you will need:  

• 5 drops of Rosemary oil
• 3 drops of Carrot oil
• 3 drops of Geranium oil
• 6 drops of Jojoba oil
• 15 ml Apple cider vinegar
• 50 ml Rosewater
• And 50 ml Distilled water

MIx all these oils together and apply on your hair twice a week to see the results.

Garlic for hair loss treatment & hair regrowth:

Garlic has high sulfur content that can remove and destroy harmful toxins. It also helps in stimulating the blood circulation in the scalp that assists hair growth and prevents hair loss. Crush a few cloves of garlic. Add coconut oil to it and boil the mixture for a few minutes. Let it cool down for a bit and then massage it into your scalp. You can leave it on for 30 minutes and then wash your hair. Do this two times in a week to see amazing results.

Hibiscus for hair loss treatment & hair regrowth:

Hibiscus is widely known for its properties to help control hair fall and promote hair growth. Hibiscus is even known to regenerate hair in bald patches! It is efficient in stopping hair fall, supporting the growth of hair, preventing premature graying of hair and nourishing the hair. Crush a few flowers and mix sesame or coconut oil to make a paste. Apply on the scalp and hair and leave it on for a few hours. Rinse off with cold water using a mild shampoo.

Coconut Milk for hair loss treatment & hair regrowth:

Coconut milk contains essential fats and proteins that contribute to a better growth of the hair follicles. Boil fresh grated coconut in water and let it cool for a while. Apply this mixture on your scalp and massage. Leave it on for about 20 to 30 minutes and then wash with a mild shampoo. Repeat this twice a week for better results.